MOMENTS | Rehash: #FBF As If! We Could Forget That ‘Clueless’ Turns 20 Years Old Today

We’ve curated the best of digital age-inspired creativity—from user-generated content, mash-ups, and remixes to collaborations between multi-disciplined makers.

Clueless, the ‘90s teen movie that married Jane Austen’s Emma with a Noxzema commercial, is having its 20th anniversary this weekend, and we’re taking a minute to celebrate how it immortalized real and invented ‘90s vernacular. Because the majority writer and director Amy Heckerling’s oft-quotedbubblegum hip-hop lingo” were written, in its satirically airheaded glory, for the movie’s exaggerated and fictional Beverly Hills. The cult classic had a refreshingly diverse cast, and Cher Horowitz said and thought what we were all feeling. Though there’s that killer wardrobe (hello, red Alaïa dress) by costume designer Mona May and the perfectly synched soundtrack by music supervisor Karyn Rachtman, we’re mostly just using the 20th anniversary to relive some of Clueless’ most quotable moments—in gif form.

July 17, 2015 by Robert Cordero

MOMENTS | Throwback: #FBF BANKS Covered Aaliyah’s “Are You That Somebody?”

We’ve curated the best of digital age-inspired creativity—from user-generated content, mash-ups, and remixes to collaborations between multi-disciplined makers.

It’s #FBF, and because today would been Aaliyah’s 36th birthday, we’re revisiting one of our favorite covers—BANKS’ magnificent interpretation of Aaliyah’s 1998 “Are You That Somebody” for BBC Live Lounge. Aaliyah’s hit song was once referred to as “Timbaland’s greatest gift to the world,” and 13 years after her death, the legendary singer’s vocal influence is still heard in the works of artists who blend the RB, bedroom-pop, and indie-pop genres. 

MOMENTS| Rehash: #FBF Laurie Anderson “O Superman (For Massenet)” Music Video Merged Performance Art x Popular Music


We’ve curated the best of digital age-inspired creativity—from user-generated content, mash-ups, and remixes to collaborations between multi-disciplined makers. 
In 1981, performance artist and musician Laurie Anderson’s “O Superman (For Massenet),” a half-sung, half-spoken, almost minimalist composition, charted #2 on the UK Singles Charts. Anderson wrote “O Superman (For Massenet),” she took inspiration from Jules Massenet’s opera Le Cid, “O Souverain”, a piece that reminded her of Napoleon’s fall at Waterloo. Sung through a robotic vocoder, the song blends politics, mantra-like aphorisms, and sentimentalism to create a timeless piece that makes the listener contemplate a world on the brink of its digital revolution.