MOMENTS | Best Of: FKA Twigs x Notorious B.I.G. Mash-up, Joe Webb’s Narrative Collages, Gil Scott-Heron “Home Is Where The Hatred Is” Reinterpreted, ‪Eric Timothy Carlson’s Exhibition, James Murphy “We Used To Dance”

We’ve curated the best of digital age-inspired creativity—from user-generated content, mash-ups, and remixes to collaborations between multi-disciplined makers.

Start your week out right with BAMIN’s (Build And Make It Now) run down of this week’s best moments in user-generated content, remixes, mash-ups, collaborations, and trends.

1. Twiggy Smalls. Listen to Terry Urban’s FKA Twigs & Notorious B.I.G. mash-up album.

MOMENTS | Rehash: #TBT Gil Scott Heron’s “Home Is Where The Hatred Is” Reinterpreted by Esther Phillips & Kanye West x Common

We’ve curated the best of digital age-inspired creativity—from user-generated content, mash-ups, and remixes to collaborations between multi-disciplined makers.

Given all the incredible blend of jazz-rap in Kendrick Lamar’s phenomenal To Pimp A Butterfly, we wanted to take a moment to look back at another great instance of jazz reinterpretation: Gil Scott-Heron’s “Home Is Where The Hatred Is.” American soul and jazz poet, musician, and author Gil Scott-Heron’s spoken word performances in the 1970s and 80s continue to be a major influence behind subsequent generations of hip-hop. “Home Is Where The Hatred Is” was famously covered by Esther Phillips and later sampled by Kanye West and Common for their collaborative song “My Way Home.”

MOMENTS | Acronym: The ‘H.E.R.’ In Common’s “I Used to Love H.E.R.” Stands For ‘Hearing Every Rhyme’


We’ve curated the best of digital age-inspired creativity—from user-generated content, mash-ups, and remixes to collaborations between multi-disciplined makers. 
In 1994, Lonnie Rashid Lynn, Jr., aka Chicago-born rapper Common, released his LP Resurrection, and his single  “I Used to Love H.E.R.” became one of hip-hop’s greatest recordings. ‘H.E.R.’ is an acronym for ‘Hearing Every Rhyme,’ which transforms the title of the song to “I Used To Love Hearing Every Rhyme”. The song samples its jazzy beats from ”The Changing World” by George Benson and is an extended metaphor that uses the degradation of a woman to represent the changes Common saw in hip-hop music in the ‘90s.