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We’ve curated the best of digital age-inspired creativity—from user-generated content, mash-ups, and remixes to collaborations between multi-disciplined makers.

Rapper and artist Yung Jake has taken emojis and made them an art form. Using a new site called emoji.ink, Yung Jake uses our favorite pictograms to create life-like collages of celebrities like Larry David, Miley Cyrus, Wiz Khalifa and Jay Z. The collages also incorporate an incredible amount of thought and detail; the fact that we often use emojis as descriptions isn’t lost in the collage-making process. In an emoji-filled text correspondence with Time Magazine, Yung Jake explained that, as part of his artistic process, he uses emojis that relate to the person. Case in point: Larry David’s features the old man emoji, and his receding hairline is made via clouds and old people sneakers.

The rapper-artist has an active Tumblr presence, but more notably, he is known for his net art videos that often merge art, hip-hop and the internet. One of his earlier works, “Datamosh,” takes the predominant net art pixel trend of and imposes the glitch affect on his own face. However, his most prolific video, titled “Em-bed.de/d,” asked viewers to share his video on social media, thus creating a self-actualizing piece on internet virality. Last year, Yung Jake had an exhibition, titled “Drawings,” at the Stever Turner Gallery in Los Angeles.

As you know, BAMIN loves collage art, and we’re even more stoked when it combines elements of digital-age innovations. Yung Jake’s emoji-collages has us feeling very digital today, so we’re grabbing a Blue Neomesh Briefcase w/ Black Neomesh Sides & Black Leather Handles $315 to get our innovative, technical fabric fix. But in a classic shape because artists need to look professional too.

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[Photo source: Time Magazine]

January 28, 2015 by Robert Cordero